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Telemedicine and Self Care

Worker with a PC.jpgPhysician, heal thyself with the support of remote monitoring, suggested Dr. Paul Johnson, Director of the telemonitoring service Xenetec last week at the International Healthcare Innovation Congress in London.

He pointed to a pandemic in lifestyle-related diseases exacerbated by growing levels of obesity in Western countries (in the UK 23 percent of us are now classed as obese—the highest level in Europe). As a consequence, incidence of chronic diseases—like asthma, coronary heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—is increasing. In the UK, chronic disease apparently accounts for 65 percent of the visits to Accident and Emergency departments.

With such a pandemic, it's fortunate advances in IT and communications make 24-hour health monitoring a reality. Vital signs like respiration and heart rate are useful indicators. A healthy heart rate has a high degree of variance, showing as a spikier trace than an unhealthy one. In addition, nocturnal breathing disorder is often a co-morbidity in asthma, COPD, hypertension and heart disease. Close monitoring of such signs could assist sufferers to manage their conditions and carers to pre-empt crises.

Dr. Johnson said that multi-centre trials in Europe show such monitoring is practicable. Patients in the trials had worn a cluster of electrodes on their chests stuck on with adhesive tape that reminded me of the spaghetti at the back of my aging HiFi system—yet compliance was high. This is a good sign. If patients can tolerate being wired up like that then compliance with newer, wearable equipment should be at least as high (see future posts).

Supported by monitoring centres, self-management of chronic illness is real option. As an example of its possibilities, Dr. Johnston referred to work by Dr Dean Ornish et al on the effect of diet, exercise and stress management on heart disease. Dr. Ornish's work assessed the power of a rigourous risk management regime to arrest—or reverse—the progression of atherosclerosis.

If it's practicable (inevitable maybe), where does remote monitoring figure in NHS plans, or indeed in the NHS National Programme for IT (NPfIT)? Do the operational vision for the NHS and the technology planned to support it need revision?

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» Remote monitoring: Ready for prime time? from FutureHIT - Speculations on the Future of Health IT
A mention on the UK-based counterpart of this site caused me to pay more attention to a couple of posts on remote monitoring that treated it in considerable depth and very thoughtfully. Meanwhile, back on this side of the Pond, [Read More]

» Long Term Care Demonstrators from Future Health IT
That will teach me to ask rhetorical questions at the end of posts. In a previous post on management of chronic conditions I asked where remote monitoring appeared in the vision for the NHS and in its NPfIT. The... [Read More]

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